Monthly Capriccio

A blog dedicated to the ezine "Monthly Capriccio," a monthly light novel magazine.

Not Anime Enough? 2009/10/13

Filed under: light novels — nolwenn961 @ 4:09 pm
Tags: , , ,

I was told that one of the biggest issues that people had with the stories that were included Karui Shousetsu Magazine was that the stories weren’t anime enough. Since that publication is this ezine’s predecessor, I imagine that this is an issue that I will have to face as well. Should the characters all have Japanese names? Does the story have to take place in Japan? Is this what gives of a distinct anime feeling in a light novel, or is it something else entirely?

I feel like this issue of not being anime also relates to our perceptions of what is and what isn’t a light novel. Wikipedia has a definition of light novels, but unfortunately, it’s not very extensive. It is a good start, though; it gives a broad clue as to what constitues the content of a light novel.

What’s your definition of a light novel? What defines the light novel overall? Is it the anime cover and manga illustrations inside alone, or do the brisk reading provided by dialogue-driven text provide the driving force behind a light novel? Most of all, what can this ezine do to provide stories that meet your definition of a light novel?

I’d like to hear what everyone’s opinions about this. Feel free to leave your comments below.

Advertisements
 

The Perfect Genre 2009/09/26

Light novels are written in a variety of genres and can of course be written in a way that overlaps and/or merges genres. In Japan, certain genres seem to be more popular, or at least it seems like more light novels are written in certain genres rather than others.

I think the most popular genres for light novels are romantic comedy, mystery, and sci-fi/fantasy, but that’s in Japan. What about in America? I think people would prefer to read sci-fi/fantasy light novels more, but that could be because many people who enjoy sci-fi/fantasy also enjoy manga, anime, videogames, and light novels.

Or perhaps it’s a simple question of demographics. Do more boys read light novels than girls? It seems that in Japan, more light novels are aimed at males. Is it the same or different for the United States and other countries?

And finally, what genre of light novel do you prefer? What genre of light novel would you like to see in Monthly Capriccio? What genre is the most appealing to you? I would like to hear everyone’s opinions on this, so please leave your comments below.

 

Is Self-Publishing the Only Way? 2009/09/19

Lately, I’ve been thinking about how light novels can become a profitable media in the US.  A lot of publishers have failed with the light novels, resulting in them dropping titles altogether.  If a translated light novel from a popular franchise with anime and manga tie-ins can’t be successful in America, what success does it have if an American (or any other individual) wants to publish their own original light novel?  Is there any hope?  Is there a real market for light novels at all? 

I am inclined to believe that there is.  In spite of all the failures that publishers have had with light novels in the past, I want to remain hopeful.  Afterall, it is still a work of literature.  As long as people like to read, there’s a chance for success.  I was reading an advice article about self-publishing. As it turns out, self-publishing is ideal for niche audiences. That’s perfect for us light novel enthusiasts who are but a niche of a niche. To me, published is published. I don’t care that a major publishing house didn’t help produce it. I just want people to read the work, and I want to see to it that more people actually know what a light novel is.

So, is self-publishing the only way to go about this? Maybe not, but right now, I think self-publishing is the best approach. There’s nothing wrong with self-publishing. If anything, it says that the author is hardworking and dedicated to the work that he or she wants the world to see.

I have another purpose for the self-publishing model. In the style of a Japanese light novel magazine or even a Japanese manga magazine, once the stories have been serialized in the ezine “Monthly Capriccio,” they will be collected into individual volumes, physical books, or e-books, if you prefer. As physical books, they can be sold to the both the people who read this ezine and to general lovers of fiction everywhere.

Maybe you don’t want to go through the hassle of a major publishing house and have them tell you no because your work doesn’t fit their business model, but at least you’ll have self-publishing which has a POD (print on demand) model so you don’t have to worry about losing any money. Just print when people want to buy your work. To me, that is where light novels have the greatest chance of success regardless if the author sells 700 copies or 70,000.

 

Relay Novel 2009/09/17

I was doing some random internet searching on the Japanese side of the internet when I came across the words “relay novel.”  I didn’t really know what it was until I thought about it.  Can you imagine it, a team of writers sitting down, one person scribbling away at the page then passes it off to the next writer sitting beside him or her?  There’s no timer, but there’s lots or pressure (maybe).  That’s how I imagined it, this high-stakes over the top literary drama.  A relay novel is not exactly like that (although it could be).

My point is what if I wrote a relay novel with some of the other writers who have agreed to contribute to the ezine?  That could be fun.  With each issue, there’s a new chapter published, and people will anticipate the next issue to find out what will happen next or what kind of twist there’ll be.  Anyway, that’s just a thought.  I’m not sure if anyone would want to do that.  Am I the only one?  It could have a really wacky or quirky name that would make people think, “Hey, what’s that?” when they read the title.

On another note, I got a story from someone who wants to write for the magazine.  I haven’t read it yet, but I’ll gladly look it over.  I’m still in need of writers as well as other people.  Maybe what this ezine blog needs is a google group.  I couldn’t find anything when searching “light novel.”  Such a shame.  Let’s get that awareness up, up, up!